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The Original Route of the Railway

The line was approximately 3 miles long running from a wharf on the River Thames generally northwards to what is now the building containing the Kempton Great Engines. In between it connected with several other pumping engine buildings, various reservoirs and filterbeds. Laying the railway started in 1914 and it ran until the tracks were taken up in 1947. By then the need for coal was much reduced and what was needed for the Kempton Great Engines either came by standard gauge train or road.

After leaving the riverside wharf at Hampton and serving the Southwark & Vauxhall "New works" pumping stations and some filterbeds. The main line ran north a short way before crossing the Lower Sunbury Road on the level. A little further on there was a triangular junction. Straight on led to the loco shed, the West Middlesex, Grand Junction and Southwark & Vauxhall "Old works". Within this area some track is still visible set in concrete.

Turning left at the triangle (roughly west) for about a half mile the main line continued before turning north parallel to the Kempton Road bridleway. In about a further quarter mile it went under the Upper Sunbury Road and into the area known as Hyde's Field.

The part so far described is unlikely to be restored in the foreseeable future as it is an active and high security area.

Within Hyde's Field the line ran parallel to a footpath known as Kent's Passage which then continues as Oldfield Road. At the point where Oldfield Road meets the Shepperton branch railway line the old narrow gauge line turned north west to follow the bigger line for about a half mile before doing a dog leg under it and then continuing on the opposite side. Just before the bridge the railway is joined on the west side by the Staines Aqueduct which feeds the Red House reservoir. The aqueduct runs alongside the old line right through Kempton works and on to Staines.

 A little further the line crossed a footpath known as Kempton Park Lane or Bunny Lane. This footpath once gave access to Kempton Park racecourse but the gate is now closed although the public still have access to the path. At the path crossing there are still rails in place. There was also a siding here which allowed access into the reservoir which is now a nature reserve. Further on another siding went to the Gauge House.

From here the line took a straight path in a WNW direction to the Kempton Great Engine house where wagons of coal could be pushed by hand into the boiler house. There were also tracks leading under the standard gauge siding where there were coal drops allowing coal which arrived by rail to be loaded into narrow gauge wagons.

This map shows the original three mile route Map based on original by Ron Howes.

kempton map rh4 051208 shrink

 

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